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We have decided to minimize maintenance of so many sites, to combine appropriate ones. Thus schoolgenius.com is now part of Allipedia.com.
This section of allipedia is concerned with
encouraging and giving hope to those who may have lost hope in their ability to get good grades.

We will show you that many famous people were considered stupid or incompetent and yet went on to achieve greatness.

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Science Failures
 Failures to Success

 

ben carson nowMy present hero is Dr. Ben Carson. The movie of his story is called Gifted Hands and is a wonderful example of someone who considered himself stupid as did all his classmates and yet went on to become one of the most successful neurosurgeons in the area of pediatrics that the world has ever known!

Ben Carson

Ben Carson – Movie “Gifted Hands”  is a fantastic family movie telling Ben’s amazing story from failure to success!

Benjamin Carson Biography

Pediatric Neurosurgeon

Benjamin Carson Date of birth: September 18, 1951

Benjamin Carson was born in Detroit, Michigan. His mother Sonya had dropped out of school in the third grade, and married when she was only 13. When Benjamin Carson was only eight, his parents divorced, and Mrs. Carson was left to raise Benjamin and his older brother Curtis on her own. She worked at two, sometimes three, jobs at a time to provide for her boys.

Benjamin and his brother fell farther and farther behind in school. In fifth grade, Carson was at the bottom of his class. His classmates called him “dummy” and he developed a violent, uncontrollable temper.

Ben-Carson-graduateWhen Mrs. Carson saw Benjamin’s failing grades, she determined to turn her sons’ lives around. She sharply limited the boys’ television watching and refused to let them outside to play until they had finished their homework each day.

She required them to read two library books a week and to give her written reports on their reading even though, with her own poor education, she could barely read what they had written.

Within a few weeks, Carson astonished his classmates by identifying rock samples his teacher had brought to class. He recognized them from one of the books he had read. “It was at that moment that I realized I wasn’t stupid,” he recalled later.

Carson continued to amaze his classmates with his newfound knowledge and within a year he was at the top of his class.

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