Jan 052016
 
  • Fos Extracts - 2018 Table of Contents

    2018-03-24   Dr. Katharine Hayhoe Tries to Scare Canadians with Threats of Warmer TemperaturesThe Coming Carbon Tax ShowdownA Billion-dollar Plan No One Should FollowCanadian Government: “Consider the gendered impacts of climate change”US Federal Court Holds First-ever Hearing on Climate-change ScienceGrowing German Opposition to Wind FarmsGlobal Warming: Real or Groupthink?MIT Report: It Will Take up to 400 Years to Transform to “Clean” Energy 2018-02-23   Tim […]

  • FoS Extracts - 2018

    By: Ian Cameron                 TABLE OF CONTENTS     2018-03-24   Dr. Katharine Hayhoe Tries to Scare Canadians with Threats of Warmer Temperatures As the IPCC Cities Conference progressed in Edmonton, March 5-8, 2018, Canada’s energy center was not going to be left out. […]

  • Modulation of Ice Ages via Precession and Dust-Albedo Feedbacks

    The slow wobble, or precession, of the axis of the Earth causes the "Great Year" because it gives warm and cool seasons over its approximate 23,000-year cycle. The advancing ice sheets during a "Great Winter" increases the Earth's albedo, reflecting sunlight and resisting the warming effect of the next "Great Summer". As the ice sheets grow and the seas cool, CO2 also reduces as it is absorbed by the oceans. Most plants suffer severe stress at 190 ppm CO2 and die at 150 ppm, because CO2 is a primary plant-food. The concentration finally reaches the critical 190 ppm level where world flora begins to die and the Gobi steppe-lands turn into a true sand desert. The ensuing dust storms dump thousands of tonnes of dust onto the northern ice sheets each year. The interglacial periods occur only every fourth or fifth Great Year. Ice core data shows that every interglacial warming period is preceded by about 10,000 years of intense dust storms. When the next Great Summer comes along, the dusty polar ice sheets can warm and melt and the next interglacial is born. Low concentrations of CO2 near the end of an ice age causes a die-off of plants leading to dust storms, reducing the ice sheet albedo, resulting in warming and the interglacial periods. […]

  • How America Can Dominate the World Energy Market

    Tom Harris, executive director of the International Climate Science Coalition, writes about America First Energy Conference on Nov. 9, organized by the Heartland Institute, contrasting its message to that from the recent UN climate conference in Bonn. Craig Idso told the audience that the whole biosphere is reaping incredible benefits from increasing CO2. Energy dominance is achievable if current development plans continue. One speaker said America could become a net exporter of oil within five years. America has the world’s largest coal reserves, but exports are hampered due to lack of export terminals. […]

  • Climate Sensitivity from the Bulk Troposphere

    A new study by John Christy and Richard McNider used the warming of the bulk troposphere from satellite data to calculate an upper limit on transient climate sensitivity. The study removed ocean effect like El Nino and effect to two major volcanoes to determine a temperature trend attributable to only greenhouse gasses and natural forcing. If natural forcing contributed nothing, which is extremely unlikely, the temperature trend is 0.069 °C, giving a climate response of 1.1 °C, which is about one-half of the value estimate by climate models. A link to the paper is at the end of the article. […]

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